Reflections on Optimism

I’ve been reflecting over the last few weeks about where I’ve grown or shifted this year as a business owner, a facilitator and coach, a person. During this process, five words have kept resonating with me

Courage, Optimism, Uncertainty, Instinct, Hope.

Here’s what Optimism has taught me this year:

It’s tightly connected to my ideas, creativity and drive.

To me, optimism is that belief that something positive is around the corner; that a risk will pay off; that I ‘can’ do the thing that feels like a massive stretch of my abilities.

It helps me grow and move past what I think is possible, to feel more fearless.

It’s me at my most energised and I’m at my best when I have it in abundance.

It can run out if I don’t nurture it

There’s been times this year when I’ve called on my optimism and it’s fell silent – all I’ve heard and felt was worry and doubt.

Things that would normally be an exciting   ‘stretch’ were overwhelming and I became increasingly and unfamiliarly risk averse.

This year I’ve learned to nurture my optimism. To rest and reflect where I can,  so I can hear its voice more clearly. To see and value it as a strength (which benefits from maintenance and attention) rather than a given.

This year optimism has helped me:

  • Approach situations with energy and openness, trusting that I’ll get something from them.
  • Step into uncertainty and help my clients feel comfortable and confident to step into it too.
  • Stay true to myself and my business values and approach, even when I sometimes feel ‘less’ on social media.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences of optimism.

Kirsten x

Photo by Matheus Bertelli from Pexels

Putting the soul back into meetings

‘How can we have meetings that are productive and uplifting, where we speak from our hearts and not from our egos?’

I love this quote from Frederik Laloux (Reinventing Organisations) – it reminds me what it’s like to be in a really bad meeting; and what is possible when you’re in a superb one.

Meetings are often the only time a team has protected time together – a time to come together to discuss, debate and decide on important issues. Yet too often they don’t feel like that, they feel soulless, dull, scary, intimidating or just a waste of time.

Instead of conversation, there are statements. Instead of collaboration, there’s competition. Where encouragement could be offered, there’s challenge. Where challenge needs to happen, there’s passive agreement or silence.

So what goes wrong? The first thing thing is to look at whether your meetings are input or output driven.

Input driven meetings

These focus primarily on process, agenda and information sharing. I call them state and inform meetings – where to a greater or lesser degree, people run through a list of what they’ve done. One by one. In turn. Then the meeting ends.

At their worst, meetings like this are a competitive battle, a place for team members to present themselves in the best light in front of colleagues or stakeholders. Listening only to find opportunities to reassert strength, disagree or demonstrate greater knowledge.

At their best, meetings like this are places where people say their bit, then stay quiet and hide for the rest of it. No eye contact, doodling as if their life depends on it and wishing it was over so they can get on with real work.

Input driven meetings tend to occur because relationships aren’t fully formed and trust is low. The overriding tone is likely to be one of fear, apathy or exhaustion.

Output driven meetings

These focus primarily on what the meeting delivers for you as a team/organisation, they’re about providing you with – clarity to make good decisions, confidence, chance to debate difficult issues and challenge each other constructively, encouragement, strength.

Meetings like this give teams and organisations the capability to strengthen and accelerate their performance. They’re spaces where trust can be built, ideas and ambitions can grow, cross-org relationships can develop, points of commonality (and difference) can be found, where failures and successes can be discussed and learned from.

Output driven meetings tend to occur where relationships are strong and trust is high. The overriding tone is often one of energy, collaboration and purposefulness.

So how can you move towards an output driven meeting? It’s about small steps which will help you to build relationships, develop trust and encourage listening. Here are 3 things to get you started:

1. Think listen, learn and discuss instead of state and inform

This approach shifts the emphasis away from speaking as a means to defend, challenge or block; and towards asking questions, learning and discussing. Something as simple as moving from ‘this is what I’m going to tell you’ to asking the team ‘what would you like to know’ makes an enormous difference.

2. Share information beforehand

Meetings are about discussing, exploring and deciding; they’re not about reading. Share critical information beforehand and keep it brief and succinct, so that your meeting is about what you do with that information rather than just sharing it with each other.

3. Debrief a success

This can be a great way to move you away from state and inform and to encourage free flowing discussion. Use the first half of a meeting to debrief something that went brilliantly (product, service, team collaboration etc.). Have a cuppa, stand up rather than sitting at tables if you would do normally, and ask yourselves…

• what was integral to our success?

• what was surprising?

• what was noticeable about how we worked together?

• what could we learn from this?

Notice what happens when you have conversations like this, and think about how you can encourage more purposeful discussion in future meetings.

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Thanks for reading,

If you’d like to bring some soul, energy and focus back into your meetings, get in touch – I’d love to hear from you.

You can reach me through LinkedIn, Twitter @kirstenlholder or through my website – http://www.kickstartdevelopment.co.uk

Photo by Ricardo Resende on Unsplash

#meetings #teams #leadership #business #communication #collaboration #motivation

When thoughts and values converge

Light_Painting_1_-_Booyeembara_Park

Steps towards something

It’s fascinating how chance meetings and conversations can develop into creative partnerships. Some potentially promising opportunities don’t blossom, while others germinate through conversations to the point of saying “Why not? Let’s give it a go.” That’s what we, Kirsten and Anne Marie, have decided to do.

Although we are united in what we believe in and what drives us (in essence, that everyone deserves to work in organisations and environments where they can thrive and contribute), we think and see things differently. It is what is emerging from this difference that is exciting us.

A moment of optimum hum

Right from our initial Skype conversations we found ourselves talking about and coming back to our experiences of great leaders and companies we had worked with.

  • What was so inspiring about them?
  • What was it about the structures, the people, the values, the atmosphere and how things had got done that had been so invigorating?
  • What was it that had instilled a feeling of belief, confidence and inclusiveness?

These weren’t companies that had massive budgets, smart offices, all the latest kit or free gym membership. In fact they didn’t have any of these. What they did have were managers and leaders who expected you to do well, and who invited and enabled you to contribute wholeheartedly.

“You’ve got a good idea for how something might be improved or done differently? Do it!”

There was never any sense of hierarchy – even when some of these workplaces were, in fact, traditional and hierarchical. These remarkable colleagues and organisations supported you when you failed,  and provided a safety net that encouraged you to go further than you thought was possible.

When you’re in a team or organisation that’s working like the one above you can almost feel it humming. There’s an energy, a buzz, an excitement, a purposefulness – to us it became ‘optimum hum’.

Leaders matter. The expectations that they set matters. The performance cultures that they influence matter. The way they create, shape and mould their organisation matters. All this creates possibilities and permission for people to be bold, to be courageous.

Where we’re heading next

We’re fascinated by what creates and sustains optimum hum – what defines it, what it feels like, how we know we’ve got it?

We want to help leaders shine a light on the inner workings of their organisation – help them understand what optimum hum looks like, for them. What encourages and enables it? What causes imbalance in their organisation and what impact does this have? How can balance be restored and optimum hum returned?

We’re excited to be starting this journey together  – to begin sharing our thoughts with you over the coming months, so look out for our twitter chats and blogs.

We’d also love to hear about your own experiences of optimum hum, and what has made some organisations exceptional places to work for you.

Anne Marie and Kirsten

Anne Marie Rattray is the founder of The Smart Work Company Ltd which helps people – independently or on behalf of an organisation – to assess and develop future-focused work skills. For more information go to http://www.thesmartworkcompany.com

Kirsten Holder is the founder of Kickstart Development which helps leaders, teams and organisations to feel clear, purposeful and energised so that they can deliver results more swiftly, more easily and more sustainably. For more information go to http://www.kickstartdevelopment.co.uk

Photograph by JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Finding wisdom in the streets

It’s not often you look at a sign like this and feel cheered, or inspired, yet that’s exactly what happened last Thursday in Leicester Town Centre, during a Street Wisdom event, organised by Learn Connect Do.

For those that haven’t heard of Street Wisdom, it’s described as a way to find ‘fresh answers to personal or work-related questions….with a mission to bring inspiration to every street on earth’. Over the last few years it’s really grown in popularity, and you can find events happening in most cities and towns.

I’ve always enjoyed using spaces as inspiration, so I was intrigued to see what came out of the Street Wisdom process, and how it could be used – not only for me, but as part of the coaching, leadership and team development work I do.

There are 3 stages to a Street Wisdom event, which generally take place over 3 hours. The first is:

Tune Up – its like a warm up for your senses, helping you to notice things more readily and connect all your senses together. We had short exercises to warm us up – looking for patterns, beauty in the unexpected etc. I was particularly drawn to this outlet during the tune up…

… I first noticed the marks that had been made by the water regularly flowing through it, and it got me thinking about whether I’m as efficient at emptying old knowledge, habits and thinking? Whether there’s enough space, light and room for new stuff to grow.

The second step is:

Quest – where you take off on your own, for anything up to an hour with a question in mind – something you’d like clarity on, to think freely and unrestrictedly on, or to make a decision on. You keep that question in mind (mine was ‘How do I help potential clients find me quickly and easily?’) as you walk – using buildings, the landscape, the path you’re treading on or even people to stimulate your thinking.

I found myself getting really distracted at first (which isn’t necessarily a bad thing),so found it helpful to have a clear question to come back to after I’d let my mind wander down different avenues (last pun I promise!).

The first thing that grabbed my attention was this set of chairs

I found myself thinking about the conversation these chairs suggest and about what helps us start or continue a conversation:

  • a common interest or shared values?
  • a shared friend or acquaintance?
  • knowing a bit about that person already?

Definitely some thoughts worth exploring further.

Next I noticed these two things, in fairly quick succession…

A Hi-Tech sign on a drain (a weird theme seems to be emerging with drains!), which made me think about the use of technology, particularly webinars – something I’d been pondering on (procrastinating really) for a while. A chance for people interested in a topic to come together and chat in an informal but informative way. This hi-tech sign put it firmly front of mind and encouraged me to give it more serious thought than I had done so far.

A shop display of tea and biscuits, which came immediately after the drain and made me think about how I could create an atmosphere which is relaxed. A webinar that’s more like having a chat and a cuppa with a mentor.

The final thing I saw, directly outside our meeting point at the end of the hour was the ‘Diverted Traffic‘ sign. I attracted some strange looks as I chuckled to myself and took photos of the sign, but it seemed to beautifully capture my thinking about what attracts or diverts potential clients.

So, to the pub – which was where our street wisdom ended and step 3 began:

Share – over a drink we talked through our street wisdom experience, capturing it on paper if we wanted, and sharing the conclusions we’d come to or answers we’d found. We could share as much or as little as we wanted, but the chance to capture our thinking and discuss it whilst it was so fresh in our minds, was an essential part of the experience for me.

Walking back to the car I found myself continuing to notice things I would have just walked past before. I found myself clearer and more ready to take action. I found myself just a little bit inspired by those few streets in Leicester, and that was a very lovely thing.

Street Wisdom events take place all over the globe, and they run frequently.

I’ll be running my own soon in Birmingham, so look out for them

With huge thanks to Helen Amery from LearnConnectDo for hosting such interesting and stimulating sessions that always make a difference, and to Clare Haynes for leading us through it.